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June 26, 2017

This bulletin is no longer being updated.

For more information on the Horizon Scanning programme, please visit http://www.lihnn.nhs.uk/index.php/lihnn/horizon-scanning

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Cancer Horizon Scanning Volume 4 Issue 6

September 30, 2013

New Herceptin jab will ‘cut treatment time’

September 30, 2013

Source: Nursing Times

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of Publication: September 2013

Publication Type: News Item

In a nutshell: A new type of treatment for breast cancer patients means that the NHS could be saved millions and massively reduce the length of treatment time. Currently, women with breast cancer are given drugs intravenously for long periods of time. Instead, an injection of trastuzumab (Herceptin) could be routinely introduced and would offer ‘a dramatic improvement’ in the quality of life of women who are battling aggressive breast cancer.

Length of publication: Webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


‘Less is more’ for radiotherapy in early breast cancer

September 30, 2013

Source: Nursing Times

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: August 2012

Publication type: News Item

In a nutshell: Results from a large trial have shown that fewer, larger radiotherapy treatments of breast cancer are at least as safe and effective as the international standard dose.

Length of publication: Webpage

Some important notes: This press release reports on the article The UK Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) trials of radiotherapy hypofractionation for treatment of early breast cancer: 10-year follow-up results of two randomised controlled trials from The Lancet Oncology. Please contact your local NHS Library to access the full article.


Women urged to finish cancer drugs course

September 30, 2013

Source: Nursing Times

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: September 2012

Publication type: News Item

In a nutshell: Women who have had breast cancer need support to ensure that they continue to take tamoxifen for five years in order to save more than 400 lives and £30m per year. Patients with low adherence to the drug are more likely to stop taking the drug early. Tamoxifen can have severe side effects for some patients.

Length of publication: Webpage

Some important notes: This press release reports on the article The value of high adherence to tamoxifen in women with breast cancer: a community-based cohort study from the British Journal of Cancer. Please contact your local NHS Library to access the full article.


Cancer patients want more say in treatment decisions

September 30, 2013

Source: Cancer Research UK

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: August 2012

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell:  Certain patient groups feel that they are not given enough of a say in their cancer treatment including ethnic minorities, younger patients and patients with rectal, ovarian, multiple myeloma and bladder cancers.

Length of publication: Webpage

Some important notes: This press release reports on the article Variation in reported experience of involvement in cancer treatment decision making: evidence from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey from the British Journal of Cancer. Please contact your local NHS Library to access the full article.


Study backs GP melanoma biopsies

September 30, 2013

Source: HSJ: Health Service Journal

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication: August 2013

Publication type: News Item

In a nutshell: A new study claims that GPs should perform initial biopsies to test for melanoma, resulting in patients spending less time in hospital.

Length of publication: Webpage

Some important notes: This press release reports on the article Mortality and morbidity after initial diagnostic excision biopsy of cutaneous melanoma in primary versus secondary care from British Journal of General Practice. Please contact your local NHS Library to access the full article.